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Classical Guitar Lessons: Sor: Progressive Pieces - Opus 44 No. 3

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[MUSIC]
Opus 44, number three,
from the Sor progressive pieces.
And the, this is a, a series of pieces I
recorded, all 24 of these,
about 14 years ago for a Naxos recording
of.
All Sor as part of their Sor collection.
And this is, it's interesting revisiting
some of these again as after 14
years of teaching and performing, because
I'm noticing that number three here really
ramps up, you know, in, in terms of the
progressive nature of the studies.
A few more things are introduced almost
immediately here in C major.
More slurs, and
in my recommended fingerings I'm putting
more a finger strokes in the right hand.
There is something about the nature of
this piece in particular.
He introduces a melody but then he
embellishes on that melody or
modifies it as the piece progresses.
And so the way that you'll see in my right
hand fingerings
that it's not the same way every time.
So that a melody note that was a C that
might have had an M on it,
might have an A, might have an A stroke on
it or
an I stroke on it the next time it comes
around because other notes are added.
And so it's a a very interesting thing to
study with,
with the fingerings and just what's
happening there.
You'll also notice some articulation
things that I'm doing in certain spots and
you can copy those as well.
Something just in the style of the of the,
of the music of the times.
So, here we go, number three Andantino.
And, here we go.
[MUSIC]