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Jazz Bass Lessons: Electric Bass: 2 Octave Major Scales

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[MUSIC]
So now we're going to
encompass the first position which
was, open to fifth fret.
And into the second position,
which is five to nine.
Fifth fret to ninth fret.
We're gonna do some two octave scales, so
that you guys can get a sense of a couple
of different ways to finger things, okay?
So, here's the E major scale, first.
We're gonna do.
First of all, we're just gonna do
traditional fingering where you have
to go up the G string a ways.
So, if we do O one four, O one four,
one two four, one two four,
one three four.
[SOUND] That's one sound.
Right, O one four, O one four, one two
four, one two four, one three four.
[SOUND] And again,
four three one, four two one,
four two one, four one O, four one O.
[MUSIC]
Okay?
So that works, that way.
You can also play it where you do one big
shift, and you play across, like this.
O one four.
O one four.
Shift.
One two four, one two four,
one three four.
[SOUND] That's a different sound.
[MUSIC]
Four three one,
four two one, four two one.
Four one O, four one O
[MUSIC]
triplets
[MUSIC]
so that's two different
ways you can do that.
Here's another way like with F major,
we're gonna go through these majors now.
One four O, one four O, three four O,
one two four, one three four.
Four three one, four two one,
O four two, O four one, O one four one.
So this is like open and then closed.
[MUSIC]
That's one way to do it,
where we use a lot of
shifting up the G string.
[MUSIC]
See, it works when you get used to,
see when I shift to a word about shifting,
is I'm gliding, the hand stays in line.
[MUSIC]
There's
a gliding motion.
I release the tension,
always, on the thumb.
There shouldn't be much pressure anyway,
on the thumb, but
whatever little's there,
I really release it on that shift.
Now, if you wanna do like we did on
the E major scale and stay on the bottom
a little bit and then shift up here and
stay in a box, you can do that too.
One four O, one four, one four,
two four one, two four one three four,
the famous other fingering that we
liked before so we have one four O,
one four, one four, two four one,
two four one, three four.
[MUSIC]
Right?
So that's what I want to do.
Four three one, four two one, four two,
four one, four one O, four one.
There we go.
So now we're at G flat again so
now we can do the very closed ones.
We can go four two, one two four.
One four two, four one two,
four one three four.
Same one as we did for
the F major actually.
You can do that the second way.
The closed way.
Or yet another one we can do
an extended finger in the G flat.
One three four, one three four, one two
four, one two four, one three four.
See how these make sense?
[MUSIC]
Kind of dividing it into threes.
[MUSIC]
So we can think of
it- Six Eight
[MUSIC]
Then again, once we get
to G major, same thing.
[MUSIC]
Okay?
So I realize now, were moving
beyond the ninth fret into third
position now, so,
[MUSIC]
right?
So now, we can use that fingering again or
we can do for
the G major this fingering two four one,
two four, one four, two four one,
two four one, three four,
which we did previously on the G
flat one of the fingers we did.
So basically showing you.
The A flat as well, you can either
play two four one, two four,
one four, two four one,
two four one, three four.
It's the same thing or, the cross,
the extended one where we go,
one three four, one three four, one two
four, one two three, one three four.
Right.
And then, you can do the same.
[MUSIC]
For
A major.
All the way up the bass.
You could either do
[MUSIC]
one, the one where we go two four one,
two four, one four, two four one,
two four one, three four.
Or the one three four, one three four, one
two four, one two four, one three four.
[SOUND] You could do that.
So there we're doing the same
thing over and over.
[MUSIC]
That's B flat, then B.
[MUSIC]
Now we're going into the fourth position,
[LAUGH] and then.
[MUSIC]
There's another one across the bass
here at B major.
We could also do this.
One three four, one two four, one two
four, one two four, one three four.
So in other words, getting used to
lining up your fingering strategies.
Then C major.
That's a good sound to go up and across
now because now we're up high on the neck
and can get muddy in the lower strings.
So one thing you can do is one three four,
one three four and
then one two four,
one two four, one three four.
And same with D flat.
[MUSIC]
Same with D.
[MUSIC]
E flat.
[MUSIC]
And that's all your majors two octaves.
So that's a way to start thinking of
fingering schemes that make sense,
hopefully, to you and to where you
have an organized fingering things so
you don't wind up having to shift
with the same fingers several
times in a row that's one
thing you want to avoid.
So hopefully that helps you with
your two octave major scales.
Now you have an idea of some fingerings
and you can experiment too and
see if you can find some
other ways to do it.
Where you're not repeating fingers,
that's the rule.
[MUSIC]