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Jazz Bass Lessons: Electric Bass: 2 Octave Major Arpeggios

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[MUSIC]
Now we are going to move
onto the two octave major arpeggios.
And I'm going to show you some
fingerings that are going,
i think, be easy to memorize for you.
First we will start with the E major,
starting from the low E, and
We're gonna use the open E,
obviously, and we're gonna go o,
one, four, two, one, four, four,
four, one, two, four, one, o.
So it's not so hard.
O, one, four, two, one,
four, Four four one.
Two four one.
O.
See the hand is set.
Pretty easy.
That way,
cuz you set your hand in one place and
there's not much of a shift there.
When you.
[MUSIC]
There's just that one little shift there
going from the fourth finger to
the second finger up a fourth like that,
between the B and the E.
So that's an open from
the bottom E fingering.
Now we can do closed fingerings,
starting with F and
this fingering will work for
all of them that you're
starting on the If you start
them all on the E string,
like this, 1-4-1-1, 4-1-4,
then 4-1-4-1-1-4-1.
So it's all just the first finger and
the fourth finger one four one one four
one four four one four one one four one
[MUSIC]
So notice how I keep my hand in line
the whole time [SOUND] and
my thumb is relax
enough to do the shifts behind the neck so
that's important so
again now we go to F sharp major And
it's literally the same fingering.
Check it out.
One, four, one, one, four, one, four,
four, one, four, one, one, four, one.
[MUSIC]
Same fingering for G.
[MUSIC]
Same fingering for A flat.
Same for A.
B flat.
B.
Sorry, forgot which one I was on, B.
Now, let's see.
Yes.
Okay, can we cut in there?
Okay.
>> [INAUDIBLE]
>> Pick up
>> And now B.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
C sharp.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
E flat.
[MUSIC]
And E.
[MUSIC]
If your bass has an E.
Some will go further.
If you have a 24 fret bass,
you can Get F and F sharp, and after that.
But we've done them all now.
That's all the keys, so
that's a very easy fingering.
I suppose if you wanted
to start sonically, for
some reason, on the A string,
and that's a valid reason.
Maybe you want this D instead of this one.
It's a different sound.
Then you would just do one,
four, one one, four.
One four.
It's always one four.
One, four, one one, four, one, four.
So that's a good fingering.
That works for all the closed notes
if you start them on the A string.
And that's a sonic preference,
sometimes I opt for
playing down lower on the neck on
a higher string, then playing up
higher on the neck on a lower string.
[MUSIC]
different sound, more powerful when you
use more string length and play lower
[MUSIC]
on the neck on a higher string.
So, now you have your choices and
hopefully that'll be an easy fingering for
you to visualize and remember.
It's a pattern that I've used all my
life and it's never let me down, so
try that one out.
[MUSIC]