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Cello Lessons: “Cripple Creek” (Beginner Bluegrass Tune)

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[MUSIC]
Cripple Creek is really
great bluegrass tune.
It's a good tune for
us to learn in the key of A.
It's gonna help us practice
some of our extension work.
And we're also gonna throw in
a blue note in there, a flat three.
Let's learn the melody phrase by phrase.
The melodic rhythm is gonna be Run,
Jimmy the whole tune.
Okay, so I'll just play everything in Run,
Jimmy and
I want you to use that same
rhythm when you're practicing it.
First phrase.
[MUSIC]
Down up down up.
[MUSIC]
Let's actually keep
our hand in the A major extension.
So we're gonna go
[MUSIC]
one two, one
[MUSIC].
Let me finish that phrase off for you.
[MUSIC]
One, two,
one, four, one.
Let's sing that together.
[MUSIC]
Let's play that, and
remember we're keeping
our left elbow forward to
support our extension handshape for
the whole phrase.
Ready?
And
[MUSIC].
One more time.
Three and.
[MUSIC]
Good,
next part.
[MUSIC]
One, two.
One.
One, one.
[MUSIC]
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
So already,
we have a question and an answer.
Question.
[MUSIC]
And answer.
[MUSIC]
Let's play both of those together.
Three, four.
Question.
[MUSIC]
Answer.
[MUSIC]
And we're gonna do the same question
again for the third phrase.
[MUSIC]
Except it's gonna end lower.
So we can set up for a second ending.
[MUSIC]
It ends with first finger on the G string.
Let's play that together.
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
As we go from the upper strings to the G
string, you can actually
move your left elbow
further forward as we
go to a lower string.
[MUSIC]
Watch my elbow.
It goes forward right
as I hit the G string.
Now, we also have a very, very special
moment in your development as a cellist.
The next note is G sharp.
[MUSIC]
Which is like, then we're gonna need
this in the next phrase, and
it's like a half position note.
Instead of extending back,
since we're already extended forward,
we're just going to actually shift back.
This is our first real shift.
It's not too far though.
We're shifting back to half position.
Half position is gonna start on G sharp.
[MUSIC]
Find that note.
It'll be half way in between where A was
[MUSIC]
and the nut where the open string is, and
in this position we're
gonna use first finger,
second finger on A, and
then bringing our elbow forward for
fourth finger
[MUSIC]
on B.
[MUSIC]
Just those three notes.
That's half position on the G string.
And the phrase we're gonna play in
that position sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
Four, two, one,
four, two, two, two.
Let's play that together.
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
Good.
Let's see if we can practice doing
the beginning, that question, and
then shifting back a half step for
the answer.
I'll play it once, just finger along,
pizz along, this first time.
[MUSIC]
Now I'll shift
[MUSIC]
The other thing you wanna keep in mind,
we're in an extended position also
called open position on
first position here.
And then, when we shift back to half
position, we're actually getting rid of
our extension, so
we're in what's called closed position,
where the fingers are at a more
comfortable distance, so we're going open
position on first position and
then closed position in half position.
Let's try that together
from that question.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Shift.
[MUSIC]
Good.
That's something we really wanna focus on.
Let's do it one more time.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Shift.
[MUSIC]
Good.
So, that's the last
phrase of the A section.
Let me play both questions
with the first answer and
on the second answer where we
shift back to half position.
Sing along or pizz and pluck and
finger along this first time.
Ready and
[MUSIC].
Shift!
Good.
We're gonna, just, let's do that again.
Why don't you play it with me.
One, two, ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Shift.
[MUSIC]
Let's do the whole thing again.
From the top.
[MUSIC]
Very
good.
I should probably point out that
I'm noticing I'm leaving my
fourth finger down on the G string,
on C sharp pretty much the whole time
after I put it down the first time.
Watch my fourth finger.
[MUSIC]
I put it down here and I leave it down.
So that I keep my hand shape,
then I release it here.
I'll put it down again, and
I'll leave it down the second time because
we're about to shift, but
that first time I do leave it down.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
What we've learned so
far, the question answer one, and
then the same question with answer two.
That's the first half of the A section.
The second half of the A section
is question answer one again, and
then we have a new ending.
And that's gonna lead us to the B section.
This new ending sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
It's kinda gnarly and
low on the G and C strings.
But we're gonna start with a nice
bluesy flat three in the scale.
So in our extended hand position
where fourth finger's on C
sharp [SOUND] we're actually gonna
play three, four, four, four.
And it sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
Let's play that together.
Three, four, four, four.
Ready, go.
[MUSIC]
Good.
I'll add a couple of notes to that.
[MUSIC]
Three, four,
four, four, two,
one, one, four, two.
It's hard to sing that low.
Again, we're gonna stay in this
extension as we go down to the C string.
Which means we're gonna need to bring
our left elbow forward even more to
keep supporting the pinky as
it moves further to the right.
Let's try this.
Sing this with me.
[MUSIC]
3, 4, 4, 4, 2, 1,
1, 4, 2, 4, 1, 2 ,1.
[MUSIC] Good. Let's try and play that.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Let's break it in half once,
just so you hear the parts.
[MUSIC]
Play it just that much, ready?
and.
[MUSIC]
Then the second part is.
[MUSIC]
Two, one, one.
Wait, sorry.
Two, four, one, two, one.
Let's try that.
[MUSIC]
Let's do that again.
Three, Four.
[MUSIC]
Good.
I'm gonna put everything together,
so we learn that whole big ending.
Sing it with me once.
Three, and.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Let's play it.
Three and.
[MUSIC]
Three, four, four, four.
Two, one, one, four, two, four,
one, two, one, one, one.
The whole section half of the A section
with the question answer one,
and the new ending sounds like this.
Sing along and pizz the fingers with me.
Ready, and.
One, O, two, one, O, four, one,
O, one, two, O, one.
New ending.
[MUSIC]
Let's play
that together.
Three, and.
[MUSIC]
Good, make sure
your left elbow's coming
forward enough to support
that fourth finger.
Let's play the whole A section.
I'll play it once, you can sing along,
pizz along, or play along, and
keep going back as many times
as you need to feel comfortable.
Here's the A section, three, and.
[MUSIC]
Shift.
[MUSIC]
New
ending.
Good.
Let's move on to the B section.
The B section's gonna start with
the phrase that's just like the ending
that we learned in the A section.
[MUSIC]
Goes like that.
Three, four, four, four,
two, one, one, one.
Let's play that.
Three and.
[MUSIC]
Good, then the next phrase goes up.
[MUSIC]
Let's play that.
Three and.
[MUSIC]
Good let's put those two together.
Ready and.
[MUSIC]
Good.
Now we're actually gonna do
the same ending from the A section.
[MUSIC]
That's the whole B section.
There's not much that's new.
Let's play our two new short
phrases with that bigger ending.
Ready?
And.
[MUSIC]
Do the whole
thing again.
[MUSIC]
That is
the whole
B section.
Just a couple of new notes.
But, I want you to shake
your left hand out,
cuz we've been holding this big extension
for awhile, and it takes a little bit
of extra strength to separate the third
and fourth finger the way we're doing too.
So, I want you to practice this slowly and
eventually you can get
it fast enough to play along with
the backing track, all the way through.
Before I leave this tune though, I want
us to play it all the way through, and
I want us to add an element of
groove to our Run, Jimmy rhythm.
By now, you're probably pretty
comfortable with the long,
short, short, long, short, short.
But because this is a fiddle tune,
we wanna add a strong back beat, so
we're always gonna wanna accent,
run Jimmy,
run Jimmy, the Jim part is the accent.
Run Jimmy, run Jimmy, run Jimmy.
So that accent is gonna be
on a down bow sometimes.
And it's gonna be on an up
bow the other times.
Let me see if I can demonstrate.
[MUSIC]
Accents.
Accents.
Up.
Down.
Up.
Down.
Swift, up.
Down.
[MUSIC]
If we can accent all of those notes,
then we're gonna have a really great
back beat that's gonna sound great when
we play like with a guitarist and
a bass player.
Let's go through the whole tune together.
And I'm just gonna keep yelling at you.
I'm gonna keep yelling up, down, up.
And we're gonna try and really keep
these back beat accents really strong.
Let's go through the whole tune.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Up, down, up, down,
up, down, shift, up.
Down.
[MUSIC]
Up.
Down.
Up.
Down.
New ending.
Up.
Down.
Up.
B section, up.
Down.
Up.
Down.
Up.
Down.
Up.
Down.
Up!
Down.
Up.
Down.
Up.
Down.
Up.
You want to really accent all of
those ups and
downs till we get a strong backbeat.
This rhythm is really going
to start to come alive if we
play it a little bit faster.
I want you to practice at
the tempo we just did for
a little while until you
feel really comfortable.
And then I'll play it through once more so
you can hear it how comes
alive at a faster tempo.
[SOUND] One, two.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
Makes you
feel like
dancing.
If you wanna get more comfortable with
this groove, which is gonna come in really
handy for a lot of fiddle tunes,
practice it in a scale.
We could just play the A major scale,
up and down one octave.
With that rhythm,
it would sound like this.
[MUSIC]
Up, down,
up, down, up.
[MUSIC]
You can practice it slow first,
but scales are a good way
to practice a new rhythm.
[MUSIC]