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Cello Lessons: C Minor - Scale & Arpeggio

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[MUSIC]
The C minor scale is going to feel pretty
familiar for you, because it uses
the same exact pitches as E flat major.
We've encountered this
relationship before,
when we discovered that F major
had the same pitches a D minor.
This is again part of
the modal relationship, and
when a major scale and
a minor scale have the same pitches,
they're referred to as the relative major
or the relative minor of each other.
So for C minor, it's going to be
the same notes as E flat major,
we're simply going to start and
end from C.
Okay, so starting on open C.
The fingering is one, two,
four then extend back for
one, two, four.
On the upper strings it's extend back one,
two, four,
and then our little half step slide.
And then we're going to go back,
low one on A string,
one, two, four and
then a little half step slide.
That's all the notes that we
can hit in first position,
and, like first plus half position.
But we can just stop right there
on C second finger as well.
So let's play [NOISE] this
together with the drone and
the metronome, and
why don't I demonstrate in half-notes.
[MUSIC]
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
Half
step
shift.
And move all the way back, to low one.
I'll go down now.
[MUSIC]
Good.
Let's learn the C minor arpeggio.
Let's see if you can find
the notes on your own.
What is the root?
Correct, C.
And the third,
you may have already guessed, is E flat,
which is the second finger on the C
string, and then our fifth is just open G.
That's our first octave,
we're going to repeat that.
Next, with the fingers four, one, two.
[MUSIC]
And then that's our arpeggio, and
then we end with second finger on the top.
I'll play it all the way down.
[MUSIC]
Let's also play this with the drone and
the metronome, at half-notes.
That's two clicks per note.
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
Go down.
[MUSIC]
Now that you have the scale in arpeggio,
I do want you to practice enough
chords with the drone and
the metronome at whole notes,
quarter notes,
half notes, and eight notes and twelve.
[MUSIC]