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Cello Lessons: C Minor Pentatonic - Improvisation (Beginner)

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[MUSIC]
With this new C minor pentatonic scale
I'm gonna want you to
explore it over a drone,
but also with the metronome.
This scale is particularly conducive
to really nice strong rhythmic playing.
Okay?
So, I'm gonna put the metronome on, and
let's do some call and
response phrases, so
we start to build our vocabulary
in C minor pentatonic.
[SOUND] Repeat after me.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
good next.
[MUSIC]
And,
[MUSIC]
and,
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
Ready and play.
[MUSIC]
Good,
that's just one octave down on
the minor pentatonic scale.
Listen again, and
[MUSIC]
ready, and play, and
[MUSIC]
I'm gonna go down and up, same speed.
[MUSIC]
Ready, and
play, and
[MUSIC]
good.
Next phrase.
[MUSIC]
Two,
ready, and
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
Two,
ready, and
[MUSIC]
two, next.
[MUSIC]
Two,
ready, and
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
listen to that one again.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
let's listen to that one again.
[MUSIC]
Play it.
[MUSIC]
Good.
As I do a couple more phrases, I want
you to see if in addition to the notes,
you can get the accents that I am doing
because this scale makes me wanna play
with a lot of syncopations and
a lot of off-beat accents.
And that's gonna come in handy when
we use it in a Jazz improvisation.
So, try and get the notes,
and the accents.
[MUSIC]
Two, ready,
and
[MUSIC]
listen again.
[MUSIC]
Two,
ready, and
[MUSIC]
two, next.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
did you notice I played a wrong note?
I did.
I played open D string which,
even though it's in C minor,
it's not in C pentatonic minor.
And so it's gonna stand out when
I add that note a little bit.
Let's try and stick to pentatonic minor.
Ready and,
[MUSIC]
and,
[MUSIC]
one more.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
good.
Let's do a couple more phrases using
the blue note, the F sharp or G flat.
Repeat after me.
[MUSIC]
Ready and,
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
And
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
Two, ready, and
[MUSIC]
that blue note is gonna sound really great
when we play it in the C pentatonic minor.
However, we don't necessarily
wanna land on that note.
I want you to think of it as a passing
note, where it's really gonna take us
up to the fifth scale degree, or
down to the fourth scale degree like this.
[MUSIC]
It's really just an ornamental
note to the scale degrees.
If you land on it really hard,
it can sound a little jarring.
And it might actually work great for
a lot of rock music, but
sometimes it's a little too strong for
jazz.
Let me just land on, it really strong a
couple times, so you hear the difference.
Okay?
Two, ready and
[MUSIC]
yeah, let's play that.
Three, and
[MUSIC]
let's do another more.
[MUSIC]
Two,
ready, and
[MUSIC]
yeah.
[MUSIC]
Two, ready, and
[MUSIC]
so that is a totally different character
when you land on that note,
and it becomes a strong note.
If you leave it as a passing tone,
[MUSIC]
it has a smoother,
even though it's still pained,
it's still kind of like a subtler feel.
And that's how we're probably
gonna use it more in jazz.
Now, we have the C minor pentatonic
scale and the blue scale,
that's what we call the scale
when we add the blue's note.
Let's try practicing improvising
four bar phrases with
the minor pentatonic scale,
and then with the blue scaled.
I'll do a couple demonstrations, but
I want you to continue
this practice at home.
[SOUND] Four bar phrases and
C pentatonic minor.
Ready, and
[MUSIC]
and
[MUSIC]
count along with me.
One.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
So, let's try and keep those four bar
phrases as we start using the blue scale.
One, two, three, and one
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
Two,
ready, and
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
You can kinda slide when you
use that blues note.
That helps make it really
feel like a passing tone.
[MUSIC]
I want you to practice these two new
scales, the minor pentatonic and
the blue scale.
And after you've finished practicing
them with the metronome making four bar
phrases.
You can actually start to apply
them to Money in the Pocket.
Both of these scales is gonna
sound great in that tune.
And I will start to give you a choice for
the different sounds and
flavors to improvise with.
In Money in the Pocket,
you'll have C natural minor, C dorian,
C pentatonic minor, and
even the C blue scale.
Each one is gonna have a different feeling
to it, and that's one of the best things
about Jazz improvisation, is you can start
to choose which scales you like the most.
And you can kind of compare and
contrast these different flavors to
each other when you're improvising.
[MUSIC]