This is a public version of the members-only Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block, at ArtistWorks. Functionality is limited, but CLICK HERE for full access if you’re ready to take your playing to the next level.

These lessons are available only to members of Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block.
Join Now

Beginner
 ≡ 
Intermediate
 ≡ 
Advanced
 ≡ 
Bluegrass
 ≡ 
Jazz
 ≡ 
Classical
 ≡ 
Rhythmic & Chordal Playing
 ≡ 
30 Day Challenge
 ≡ 
+Music
 ≡ 
Video Exchange Archive
 ≡ 
«Prev of Next»

Cello Lessons: Alternating Scale - Improvisation (Beginner)

Video Exchanges () submit video Submit a Video Lesson Resources () This lesson calls for a video submission
Study Materials Music Theory
information below
Lesson Specific Downloads
Play Along Tracks
Close
resource information below Close
Collaborations for
resource information below Close
Submit a video for   
Cello

This video lesson is available only to members of
Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block.

Join Now

information below Close
Information
 ≡ 
Course Description
 ≡ 

This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Cello Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

CLICK HERE for full access.
X
Log In
X
[MUSIC]
In a previous lesson, I was talking about
how you already know four
different minor scales,
in the key of C,
that you can apply to Money In the Pocket.
We've got C minor, C dorian,
we've got C pentatonic minor,
and also the C blues scale, which adds
the flat five to C pentatonic minor.
While we're improvising in jazz,
a big part of our expression can be
changing scales, in an improvisation.
In the blues that we're gonna learn next,
C Jam Blues, we're specifically gonna
practice alternating between the major and
minor pentatonic scales.
This kind of ambiguity between major and
minor is a key part of the blues.
And so,
I wanna give you a preparatory exercise,
before we jump into that
in the next lesson.
I'm gonna set up the metronome and
the drone.
And we're just gonna play a four bar
phrase in C major pentatonic, and then
we're gonna follow it immediately with a
four bar phrase in minor pentatonic, okay?
I'm gonna demonstrate
a couple alterations,
so you really start to hear how these
qualities compliment each other.
[MUSIC]
Ready, and.
[MUSIC] Now minor. [MUSIC]
Back to major.
[MUSIC]
Minor.
[MUSIC]
Back to major.
[MUSIC]
Back to minor.
[MUSIC]
Let's do that scale.
[MUSIC]
Up major and then compare it to up minor.
[MUSIC]
Let's do the same thing down,
major
[MUSIC]
now down minor.
[MUSIC]
We'll do a couple more major.
[MUSIC]
And then a minor.
[MUSIC]
One last one.
[MUSIC]
Now minor,
[MUSIC].
Good, let me just throw in that blue note,
and
compare major pentatonic
to the blue scale.
Let's see how much darker
that comparison can be?
One, two, major.
[MUSIC]
Blue scale.
[MUSIC]
Kinda slid there to the flat five major.
[MUSIC]
And now blue scale.
[MUSIC]
And major.
[MUSIC]
To blues.
All right.
I want you to practice with the drone and
the metronome,
seeing if you can change these four
bar phrases, between major and minor.
Once you get comfortable with that,
then we can start to learn and
improvise the C Jam Blues.
[MUSIC]