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Mandolin Lessons: Tennessee Waltz

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[MUSIC]
One, two, three, one, two.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Alright let's take a look at Tennessee
Waltz now.
I've been getting some requests for
a, nice slow tune that, that really breaks
down tremolo and uses tremolo and
some double stops and that's what this is
gonna be all about.
Great tune.
Classic country hit.
Just, just looking at the melody.
[MUSIC]
The basic melody, G, A, B.
I like to slide into that B.
I actually start the tremolo on the B-flat
and continue it up into the B.
Just for those of you who aren't catching
all of that.
[MUSIC]
And then the tremolo doesn't restart.
It's just a continuation of the left hand
moving from the B to the D.
The right hand continues, then it stops to
pluck the G again.
The G and the A are single notes.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Then the high G and A are also single
notes.
I shift my first finger on the G note,
second on the A.
And then I do a hammer while tremeloing.
[MUSIC]
Two times, it's an A note to a B note,
but the tremolo starts on the A,
[MUSIC]
and it's just the action of the hammer
[MUSIC]
that brings that B note in.
[MUSIC]
And then it's a trill.
[MUSIC]
But the tremolo never stops.
[MUSIC]
So the rhythm is really in the left hand.
The right hand is,
not gonna provide you with any
articulation of where those notes happen.
[MUSIC]
The hand never stops its back and forth.
[MUSIC]
And
you're playing the E on the seventh fret.
[MUSIC]
I play those all with single notes.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
F-Sharp, G, D, B.
Then there's a hammer.
[MUSIC]
I don't, I don't usually tremolo this.
I just do the hammer with my fourth.
That might be hard for some of you, to
keep the second and third held,
on the third and fifth, and do the hammer
there.
So go ahead and move up.
[MUSIC]
Here's a nice option.
[MUSIC]
Second and first, hold the D and G.
[MUSIC]
The hammer was done with the third.
[MUSIC]
And then you just jump over to a B and D.
And you tremolo.
[MUSIC]
While hammering the A to the B.
[MUSIC]
And then you play the A and
the D, D at the change to the D chord.
So let's review all of that, up to that
point.
[MUSIC]
Hammer, hammer, trill.
[MUSIC]
Shift.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
That's it, it's hammer, hammer, then.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
While the D is being at.
[MUSIC]
You can do a little fill.
[MUSIC]
And three, one,
because it's two bars of D chord.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
And that's G, F sharp, D.
[MUSIC]
A little variation.
I play the open D as a pick up.
D, G, A.
Same slide from
the B-Flat to the B.
Then it's a slide E, D.
[MUSIC]
And another variation, B, D, B, G, E.
[MUSIC]
I tremolo the G to the E.
[MUSIC]
So that ending is double stopped.
[MUSIC]
G and B, 10 and 7.
It's all a G-Chord.
It's just outlining the parts of the
arpeggions.
[MUSIC]
D and G, B and G.
[MUSIC]
That's 7 and 3, A and C, G and B,
F sharp and A, and then you end on B and
G.
Nice little double stops.
So all the way back to the beginning.
Slide D.
[MUSIC]
Hammer,
trill, double stop.
Hammer, hammer to the A and B.
[MUSIC]
Now this time,
I'm playing the double stop, the high G
with the D.
[MUSIC]
Sorry, try and
stay with the same variation.
Slide to the B.
[MUSIC]
Then the high D.
[MUSIC]
That's a,
trill, or a, hammer pull from B to C and
back off.
[MUSIC]
G, E.
Then the double stops.
[MUSIC]
Now we're into the bridge.
[MUSIC]
What the heck is that?
The chords are G to B7.
[MUSIC]
You guys know that B7 chord?
4, 1, O.
It's a little bit like a C, like a
Bluegrass C chord,
moving back one fret and it's a B chord.
Lift the second finger and its a B7.
Okay?
And this is a strange chord because we're
going from a G chord to that chord.
[MUSIC]
Then to the C chord.
[MUSIC]
So we wanna reflect the, the proper
harmonies that go with these chords as we
move, as we play the melodies.
[MUSIC]
So here it's a G chord,
I'm playing a B note.
I went from the D string, ring open.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
But now I need the D sharp,
because that goes with the B7 right?
[MUSIC]
And now I'll tremolo all those.
And I do these little smears to try and
make the inflection
of what a fiddle player would do, slurring
backwards.
[MUSIC]
It's just one fret to the F-sharp,
and then you pick up that E note with the
first finger.
[MUSIC]
And then when you come back to G,
you slide into it with the second.
[MUSIC]
And you slide back to the open.
So it's this whole greasy way of playing.
[MUSIC]
Sliding back, sliding up, okay?
Tremolo never stops.
[MUSIC]
It might get faster.
[MUSIC]
If you wanna get louder.
And it,
[MUSIC]
because you think about tremolo,
if we're going really slow and we're
hardly holding the pick very strong,
the pick is kind of flopping.
[MUSIC]
That's our quiet tremolo.
As soon as we start holding onto the pick
a little harder, the volume comes up.
But we have to be careful of that because
it tends to want to get stuck on
the string if it's being held too tight.
That little bit of looseness, relaxing
that pick so there's some give in it,
is gonna help it actually go across in and
out of the strings smoother.
And then if you want more volume, I just
like to speed it up.
And that just gives you more plucks per
square millisecond.
Right.
[MUSIC]
Now this is a D chord, and it's held.
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
The A note is actually a D chord.
[MUSIC]
So I try to fill with something
that's gonna highlight and provide some
harmony that's in the D scale.
That's a D7, so I like the D and the F
sharp.
[MUSIC]
I work
myself up to this double stop, F sharp and
C.
Then we're back to the melody.
[MUSIC]
And that's your Tennessee Waltz.
I hope that helps a sort of break down
some of my thought patterns anyway around
how to play this tune.
Actually recorded it with Brian Sutton, so
you should check out our version of it.
We do a lot more improvising on it, of
course.
But hopefully, it'll provide a little
inspiration.
See you soon.
[MUSIC]