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Electric Bass Lessons: Funk - Intermediate

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[MUSIC]
So,
straight out of the 60s came another style
called Funk, and
of course this is yet another blend of
music as most music is.
This is a blend of soul, jazz, R&B, and
rhythmic danceable music and
basically this is, the funk was when they
really laid on the one chord and
kind of stayed away from too many changes,
but
just laid into the one chord in favor of
the rhythm and the groove, you know?
And James Brown was the one of the
original godfathers of the funk and
groups started to jump in there as well,
like Sly and the Family Stone,
the Ohio Players and Commodores and, and
especially George Clinton.
So check all these guys out if you can.
Funk is usually based on an extended vamp
on a single chord.
And that's kind of the difference between
traditional funk and traditional R&B.
So, this tune that we're gonna play, the
bass line is driving the song.
I mean, it's just really, the, the hook of
the song, basically.
And all the things we talked about come
into play.
During the B section and we have the
driving bass line then we have
the E major scale going up the neck, right
before the hook and the, the chorus and
the verse are basically the same thing
it's just this driving bass line.
And it's not only supportive, but the line
is a hook in itself.
So check out some funk with my buddies.
M.T., Michael Thompson and J.R, John
Robinson on drums.
>> Three, four.
[MUSIC]
[LAUGH].
>> Yeah.
Well, I know ha, I have some funksters out
there, and
I know some of you've got some funk to lay
on me so this is where I'm going to
invite you to jam along with JR and MT,
and get some of your funk back to me.
Again, before you send it in,
check out some of the other video
exchanges with the other students.
But take a listen, if you hear any ideas
you wanna use.
Otherwise, send me some funk.
I can't wait to hear it.
[MUSIC]