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Electric Bass Lessons: Pop - Intermediate

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[MUSIC]
Popular music.
Let's see, how do you describe it?
It's very difficult but, cuz for me, so
many styles of music,
blend together, in a way that you can't
really define.
You know, what's the difference between
Pop and Rock, Rock and
Soul, Soul and Blues, Blues and Funk, Funk
and Jazz.
They all kind of, are related.
They're, they're distant cousins at, at
best.
And so, but Pop music derived from the
word popular.
There's something that basically,
becomes music that people can understand
on the masses.
On the mass levels, a lot of music in
early 60s,
pre British invasion Was made in the Brill
Building in New York,
songs written by Carol King and Neil
Diamond and Neil Sedaka,.
And Pop, musicians would back those,
those songs and, would keep it very
simple.
So, really sophistication is not, one of
the parts of popular music.
However, good Pop tunes are pretty
difficult to craft or
write so, there's a real skill to writing
a good Pop song and
what we're doing here next is a song in
the key of C.
And it has, sort of a pop policy
Rockish [LAUGH]
feel and style.
But there is simple driving bass line,
[SOUND] again, the eighth notes just
driving along,
[SOUND] one of my favorite, players is
Sting.
And his, his sort of driving bass line
[SOUND] with skips every now and then.
[SOUND] Very, very unusual but great way
of,
playing a driving bass line.
I'm gonna keep it simple here.
We start, with the harmonics, [SOUND] on
this.
And generally, I am gonna use the basis of
supportive instrument,
in this version of a Pop song and imagine
lyrics being written over it.
So here's our, here's our pop version of
the song and sea.
[MUSIC]
So now I'd like to give you a chance to
play with J.R. and M.T, play along with
the backing tracks and listen to,
the track and let me know what your idea
of, of a good Pop bass line is.
I'm just keeping it pretty simple.
So I'd love to hear what you have to play.
And, of course before you send it in, be
sure to check out some of the other video
exchanges that I've done with the other
students.
But there here's a chance now for you, to
step into my shoes and
play with these great musicians and, let
me hear what you would come up with in
this situation where you're gonna create
great, simple but genius, Pop bass line.
Can't wait to hear it.
[MUSIC]