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Skratch Lessons: Beat Juggling with Mista B Part 1

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[MUSIC]
Yo,
what up man, Scratch University full in
effect.
And we got Mr. B here.
[MUSIC]
Tell them what you know, bro.
>> Hey, I'm Mr. B, I'm apart of 414 I come
from San Francisco, the Bay area.
All over.
But I'm known for being DJ battles from
the get go.
I was a former ITF USA Champion, former
DMC National Champion,
former World DJ Contender, what not.
And I've been in various DVDs and DJ
battle videos.
[MUSIC]
>> What are you gonna tell the kids
out there that are just starting out on
the beat juggling aspect of turntablism.
What will basically help?
>> Well first, with any kinda DJing, you
should learn how to mix first.
So like, you know your rhythms, your
tempos.
Cuz if you just try to beat juggle, and
not know anything else,
then you're just gonna make a mess of
sounds.
And basically you wanna know the counts
for music.
You know, you wanna know how to count like
eight bar count and everything.
And now count.
And first off, you have to listen to
music.
You'd have to listen to what kind of beats
you wanna juggle first.
I mean, you don't wanna juggle something
with like a lot of like-
Sounds like synths, and horns, and stuff
cuz it'll just be too busy.
[NOISE].
>> So you broke it down on what kids
should be listening for, you know, when,
when they start a little beat juggling
line-up, I guess you could call it.
>> Yeah.
>> So simplify it for them.
You know, what to look for, what to listen
for, and, you know, how to feel.
>> If you're first starting off juggling
you should start out with dry drums,
or breaks within the song.
Boom baps, you know, boom, boom, bap,
boom, boom, boom, bap.
It's easier to grab those sounds and
rearrange them.
And you could just keep riding them, boom,
boom, bap, boom, boom, bap.
Boom ba-bab.
It's the most fundamental way.
And depending on how you feel on the
turntables,
you're gonna have to play around a little
bit.
So you have to get comfortable moving back
to back on the turntables, you know?
Some kids, they start off really slow.
I'm gonna do a little example.
They might move side to side really
exageratedly.
So they might be on this side.
[MUSIC]
They might really move
side to side too much.
[MUSIC]
You
gotta stay still because you're just gonna
be like, making waves and stuff.
Stay solid, stay grounded.
>> What else can they expect to you know,
elevate from juggling two of the same
beats?
>> Expect an adventure, an audio
adventure, because, at first, especial-
>> That'll work.
Yeah.
>> Especially if you don't know what
you're doing at first,
you're gonna be like, whoa, what's going
on here, right?
You're gonna be trying to juggle these
songs, right?
[SOUND] And then you be like, oh man, I
forgot my spot.
And then you'll throw it in all like, man,
I forgot my spot again and so,
just be comfortable.
Just get in the groove.
Cuz it's all about feeling.
[SOUND]
>> Groove.
[SOUND]
>> Yeah.
[MUSIC]
People I would suggest to watch
to fundamentally learn beat juggling is
folks like,
of course Steve Dee, Rob Swift, all the
X-Ecutioners.
Of course Shortkut, Babu.
Honestly a lot of cats from like mid 90s,
early 90s to late 90s.
That's a real fundamental foundational way
to learn beat juggling.
>> Well, speaking about different modes is
like, you know,
what when you're doing a set.
>> Hm.
>> And you know, you choose what sounds or
you know, cuts you're gonna use,
how does that affect, you know, your, your
creative mode at the moment when,
when you, you know, pop in a certain
sound.
>> Depending on what I'm doing the set 4-
>> Mm-hm.
>> How to set sounds, that kinda
determines or
dictates where I'm going to when I enter a
battle or do a showcase.
>> Yeah, that's good, that's good.
>> Because say if it's like a 90 minute
head to head,
then I wanna get pretty fierce in my
patterns.
And depending on the music, if it's like
something that's not
meant to be broken down, if it's meant to
be at real time,
then I'll just try to flex on the real
time patterns.
But if the song, I feel, cuz there's a
breakdown,
then I'll break it down and accordingly to
how I feel it should be.
And I'll get down in the patterns.
I might get a little too crazy on them,
but that's just the way I do.
[MUSIC]
>> Yeah man,
like, you know, when you're in the moment
and you know, you, you've,
you've got that, that, that, that beat
going.
You know, and you take it to another
rhythm, even another count.
>> Mm-hm.
>> You know, just,
just chopping up that you know, one
fourth, one eighth, whatever.
You know, and, and just you know, feeling
that, that groove again.
You know, to tell the folks what's, what
that's like.
>> From personal experience when I used to
watch DJ battles,
the DJ would always be judged on his for
juggling.
They'd be judged on normal patterns, the
breakdown.
And if they could take it to another level
like speed it up, or change the speeds.
And so I've noticed back in the day,
it was about the warm up patterns and the
breakdowns.
And then people have gotten like really
crazy with it.
Some people would like put on 45.
>> Right.
>> I guess Roc Raida started the whole 45
juggling style.
So he would just do it really fast.
[MUSIC]
And
with that style you could still break it
down.
[MUSIC]