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Banjo Lessons: Finger Picks

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[MUSIC]
All right.
We're gonna take the next step towards
playing Bluegrass music by adding
finger picks to your right hand.
Here is the finger pick.
And make sure you don't have it going like
this.
The part that comes down should actually
come up from the bottom, like that.
And you're gonna put one on your index
finger,
one on your middle finger, and one on your
thumb.
Like that.
Now, I remember, on my very first banjo
lesson, my teacher, Hal Glatzer I
came to the first lesson just with my bare
fingers, I brought them with me.
And I was just playing along and it
sounded like Bluegrass but
it was, something was missing.
And he said, when you come back for
the next lesson just make sure you get
some finger picks.
And I remember when I started playing I
had this.
[SOUND]
The sound of all that pick noise going on.
Now you may find that that's a little
distracting, but
after a while you just won't even notice
it anymore.
[SOUND] It's just sort of one of the
natures of the thing.
It just, you'll find that there is pick
noise a lot of the time.
[SOUND] But it'll quickly disappear, you
just won't be hearing it anymore.
And it gives you more of that hard driving
sound.
You have the metal against metal.
[SOUND]
Now what I use,
there are a lot of different finger picks
out there, and
you can experiment and just decide where
you wanna go to with, with the pick thing.
I tend to use Dunlop picks.
And these come in different gauges, and I
use the .020 gauge because they're
stiff enough that they give you good
resistance and you can really pick hard.
But they're not so stiff that they're
uncomfortable on the fingers.
And you can, you can move them around a
little bit if you want to.
You can bend them this way.
And, the thing you'll find is you, once
you get them from the store they might
just feel good, but your fingers might be
small and
you might wanna push them together a
little bit like that.
Or you might need to expand them a little,
little bit if you have bigger fingers.
And sometimes people push the front up.
Some people have them straight out.
Going like this.
Mine are s, somewhat in the middle.
So it's something you can experiment with
but don't get too crazy with it right now.
Just put them on your finger and start
playing.
And if they start flying off, make them a
little tighter.
If they're too uncomfortable open them up
a little bit.
Picks.
[MUSIC]