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Banjo Lessons: Chords in Proximity

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[MUSIC]
If
you wanna get a little fancier rather than
just having a D seventh,
you could have a D ninth.
[MUSIC]
And
I don't wanna get theoretical right now.
[MUSIC]
But just know that if you just take that
position and add the ring on the ninth
fret of the third string.
[MUSIC]
And again,
Bill Keith is the one that really brought
the ninth chord to Bluegrass.
Earl uses it a little bit, but Bill Keith
is the one that was really overt about it.
[MUSIC]
And.
The ninth chord has the seventh, the
flattest seventh.
[MUSIC]
But
it also has the ninth note of the scale.
[MUSIC]
Which is also the same as the.
[MUSIC]
Second note of the scale.
[MUSIC]
So for Do-re.
[MUSIC]
Do-re.
You go from the seventh to the ninth fret
to get the second note of the D scale or,
which is the same as the ninth.
[MUSIC]
So that's the D ninth.
So you can go G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
D ninth.
[MUSIC]
Or G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
Which you just go up,
take the C up two chords, two frets.
[MUSIC]
Or G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
D seventh,
this is a little bit of a stretch.
[MUSIC]
Where you have the flatted seventh,
the C note on the bottom.
[MUSIC]
So I'm barring.
[MUSIC]
The index across the tenth fret of
the first four strings.
[MUSIC]
So.
[MUSIC]
Tenth fret of the third, fourth string,
I'm sorry.
Middle goes to the third string, 11th
fret.
[MUSIC]
And
the index is already barring the tenth
fret of the second string.
Pinky is on the first string, 12th fret.
[MUSIC]
I don't imagine most of you are gonna
be using this chord.
[MUSIC]
There's a D seventh,
it's a little bit easier where you just
move your C up two frets.
And ring the index across the first two
strings.
[MUSIC]
So you have the C up here on top.
[MUSIC]
On the tenth fret of the first string.
[MUSIC]
So G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
Or you could do this.
[MUSIC]
This sounds Beethovian.
Beethovenian, I guess that is how you
would say that.
[MUSIC]
From the ninth symphony, perhaps.
[MUSIC]
He does some voicings like this.
[MUSIC]
So instead of the,
the seventh being like this, where you're
barring the seventh fret,
first three strings, pinky on the tenth
fret of the first.
[MUSIC]
You add to the pinky,
rather ring on the second string, tenth
fret and
just have the index on the third string,
seventh fret.
[MUSIC]
So G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
D seventh.
[MUSIC]
Which is really pretty.
[MUSIC]
Okay, so you've done the bar.
[MUSIC]
F position G.
[MUSIC]
D position G.
[MUSIC]
And remember, these apply to any chord.
You can start with the barred C.
[MUSIC]
And do the same positions for that.
But we're just talking about G, because as
always, we are very G-centric,
playing Bluegrass Banjo.
So.
[MUSIC]
Just to finish off.
[MUSIC]
Let's do the final bar up here at
the 12th fret.
[MUSIC]
There's G.
[MUSIC]
And here's C.
[MUSIC]
Your D position.
[MUSIC]
Moved all the way up between the 12th and
14th frets.
[MUSIC]
Bar G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
And D.
[MUSIC]
Or
you could open up the fourth string for
the D.
[MUSIC]
Or do this.
[MUSIC]
Which is the D seventh with the middle on
the first string, 12th fret ring and the
second string, 13th fret and
the index on the third string, 11th fret.
[MUSIC]
That's a pretty sound.
[MUSIC]
So G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
And
here's a D ninth chord if you wanna get
fancier.
It's the same as the C ninth.
[MUSIC]
But here it is up here.
[MUSIC]
So you have the,
the bottom two notes of the D chord by
using the middle and index and
then you have the pinky on the ninth fret
of the first string.
[MUSIC]
And ring on the second string.
[MUSIC]
13th fret.
[MUSIC]
So
the nice thing about this 13th is the
pinky, if you're going from G.
[MUSIC]
To C and then you wanna go to the D chord,
you're pinky.
[MUSIC]
Is a common note between the C chord and
the D ninth chord.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
So most simply you just go G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
So, those are some chords in proximity.
[MUSIC]